The easiest solution to electronics recycling is also the simplest

 

           Published by American Retroworks Inc., February 2005.  Copies available at www.retroworks.com

 

 

Why should private industry recycle electronics when they can get the metals out of the ground for peanuts?

 

Hard Rock (i.e. metal) mining produces 45% of all toxics released by all USA Industry;  95% of all metal mining occurs on federal land;  14 out of the 15 largest superfund sites are hard rock mines.   The more expensive the metal, the bigger the mine and the more toxic the process.  But USA’s main mining policy has been unchanged since 1872 (when the price of leasing the land, taking the metals, and leaving the pollution was set at $5 per acre).

 

What happens if a country reforms mining laws just a little bit?  Here’s an example:

 

HEADLINE 1:    OTTAWA, July 31, 2001

CANADA REFORMS 1977 MINING POLLUTION LAWS

http://www.ec.gc.ca/press/2001/010731_n_e.htm 

"New federal regulations to reduce pollution from metal mines.."  Canada rewrites 1977 mining pollution regulations to improve mining pollution, helping to level the playing field between recycling pollution enforcement and mining pollution enforcement.

 

 

HEADLINE 2:  LONDON,October 24, 2001

CANADIAN MINING EXECUTIVE CALLS FOR SUSTAINABILITY

http://www.planetark.com/dailynewsstory.cfm/newsid/12962/story.htm

"Mining companies need to work in tandem with governments and NGOs to produce a viable sustainable development model for the industry, David Kerr, president of Canadian miner Noranda, said this week. "  Noranda reacts to Canadian laws leveling the playing field in pollution per ton recycled v. per ton mined.

 

 

HEADLINE 3:    TORONTO,  July 9, 2003

CANADIAN MINING COMPANY INVESTS IN THE LARGEST E-SCRAP RECYCLING INFRASTRUCTURE IN AMERICA

http://www.platinum.matthey.com/media_room/1057742102.html

“Canadian mining company Noranda has announced the reorganisation of its wholly owned, US-based recycling arm into a dedicated new company called Noranda Recycling Inc.  The new company will comprise three recycling sites previously operated by Micro Metallics Corp, located in San Jose and Roseville in California, and Lavergne, Tennessee.  A fourth plant at East Providence, Rhode Island will be taken over from Noranda Sampling Inc, and a new one set up in Brampton, Ontario.”

 

This happened quickly after Canada rewrites the 1977 mining laws.

 

Imagine what could happen if the USA rewrote the General Mining Act of 1872?

 

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